Tuesday, November 14, 2006

50 abducted in Baghdad

This was the initial story: Armed men in Iraqi police uniforms have abducted dozens of men from a government building in central Baghdad. An interior ministry source said that 20 employees from the higher education ministry were seized, but a spokeswoman for the department itself said "100 or maybe 150" had been taken, including visitors to the building. More.

Later, it turned out to be about 50 people who were kidnapped, but still one of the largest mass abductions in Iraq: "There were varying estimates of the number of people kidnapped, but it appeared that at least 50 were seized — one of the largest mass abductions in Iraq. Authorities said as many as 20 were later released, but said a broadcast report that most hostages were freed appeared to be false. The assault came on a day that saw at least 117 people die in the mounting disorder and violence gripping the country." More.

Newly-arrived soldiers with the Canadian International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Kabul, listen to a threat assessment briefing at Kabul International Airport, Afghanistan.
Newly-arrived soldiers with the Canadian International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Kabul, listen to a threat assessment briefing at Kabul International Airport, Afghanistan.

Newly-arrived soldiers with the Canadian International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Kabul, listen to a threat assessment briefing at Kabul International Airport, Afghanistan.
Over 500 soldiers of Joint Task Force Afghanistan assemble near the Canadian memorial at Kandahar Airfield (KAF) for the Remembrance Day ceremony. Present was Chief of Land Staff (CLS) Lieutenant General Andrew Leslie, Army Chief Warrant Officer (CWO) Lacroix, Commander of Canadian Reserve Brigadier General (BGen) Tabbernor, Joint Task Force Afghanistan Commander B Gen Tim Grant and Joint Task Force Afghanistan CWO Kevin Patterson. Joint Task Forces Afghanistan is part of Canada’s contribution to the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. This mission is about Canadians and their international partners helping Afghans rebuild their lives, their families, their communities and their nation. Canadian operations will work to improve the quality of life of Afghans by providing a secure environment in which Afghan society can recover from more than 25 years of conflict.

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